All posts tagged risk management

Meteo Protect and BNP Paribas launch innovative solutions for weather risk management

BNP Paribas Meteo protect

Meteo Protect, the European leader in weather risk management, has entered into a strategic partnership with BNP Paribas to offer BNP Paribas’s corporate and institutional clients a complete range of weather risk financial management solutions.

Meteo Protect and BNP Paribas today launched a unique and comprehensive range of financial risk management solutions for BNP Paribas corporate and institutional clients. As a result of this alliance, BNP Paribas is the first bank in France to allow its clients to put in place effective financial solutions to manage their exposure to the increasing risk of adverse weather conditions.

BNP Paribas customers may now also access consulting services to assess and manage their weather risks. Meteo Protect’s team of meteorologists, climatologists, quantitative analysts and actuaries will provide BNP Paribas’s customers the means to manage volume, yield and price risks.

“Thanks to this alliance, clients of BNP Paribas whose activity is affected by the weather at any point along the supply chain may now cover against increased costs, offset declines in turnover, or limit the volatility of their financial results from one year to the next,” says Dr. Jean-Louis Bertrand, Director of Research and Development of Meteo Protect.

“This exclusive partnership allows our customers to analyze and better understand their exposure to changing weather. This approach is fully in line with our purpose to serve our clients better by offering innovative services to support the growth of their business in a sustainable manner, “says Mr. Frédéric Rochoux, Head of Business Development Business in Retail Banking in France of BNP Paribas.

The healthiest cereals are laden with cancer-causing chemicals

The unexpected role of the insurance industry in reducing harmful chemicals in the food supply

muesli packs

Raw rolled oats and grains, fruits, seeds or nuts… On the face of it, muesli is the ultimate healthy breakfast choice, enough to make one positively smug about one’s clean living. But take a closer look, and that Instagram-worthy dish may in fact be a lethal cocktail of cancer-causing endocrine disruptors, no matter that the box guarantees 100% natural ingredients. In the fight to safeguard your health, could it be that risk managers are the unlikely champions that agri-business needs to safeguard your health?

According to a recent study, the majority of (non-organic) packaged muesli cereals, touted for being high fibre, low calorie and rich in antioxidants, protein and omega-3 fatty acids, are far from being the healthy start to the day they claim to be. Rather, the French environmental group “Generations Futures”, recently conducted a study of popular muesli cereals sold at supermarkets under reputable brand names to ascertain whether they contained any traces of chemic products. Taking 15 non-organic and 5 organic muesli cereals to their laboratory, the results were shocking: 100% of non-organic muesli samples contained pesticide residuals.

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The winners and losers of El Niño

ski

As 2015 wound to a close, it was assigned to the record books as the world’s warmest year. Of course, global warming is widely considered to be at play, but meteorologists are particularly interested in the strength of this year’s El Niño, which has exacerbated droughts in some areas, increased floods in others, and led to an unusually mild winter in North America and Europe. The effects of this unusually warm winter on the world economy are representative of the diverse financial consequences of El Niño and of climate variability generally, with weather being blamed for increased production costs, reduced revenues, and reduced GDPs. The question for each of these companies is whether they were prepared for El Niño and integrated weather risk management into their development strategies.

Exploring the El Niño phenomenon

El Niño is well known as a cyclical phenomenon that occurs about once or twice per decade that sees the warm waters of the central Pacific expand eastwards towards North and South America. During the summer period, it increases the risk of decreased rainfall in the Eastern Pacific (India, Indonesia and in the northern part of Australia), and conversely, it rains more in the southern United States and on the west coast of South America. In winter, when El Niño peaks, temperatures are abnormally high in North America and Europe, and there is more intense storm activity in the Gulf of Mexico. It is also accompanied by intense rains. El Niño leads to a significant increase in the number, duration and intensity of weather anomalies around the world.

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Storm in a teacup

flood UK dec. 2015

It’s being called the “great flood of 2015”, as Britain has been pummelled by seven storms this winter, including Abigail, Barney, Clodagh, Desmond, Eva and Frank. Further, emergency services and volunteers have been working around the clock to deal with the immense damage caused by the opening of a barrier on the River Foss on Boxing Day for a four-day period, flooding a large swath of York, in a controversial attempt to stop the flood spread caused by the downpour. In total, more than 180 flood warning and flood alerts are now in place across the UK and 27 “danger to live” warnings are in effect across central and norther England and Wales.[1]www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/uk-weather-nasa-satellite-image-7085048

Along with the floodgates, many questions have been raised as a result of the catastrophic financial consequences of the storms of this winter regarding the state of preparedness of the UK’s public and private sector in responding to climate change today. They concern not just how the flood defences are inadequate to handle the “new normal” of more severe and frequent extreme weather events facing the UK, but how risk management solutions such as flood insurance are failing the public as the full extent of the total uninsurable losses, and the slowness in getting EU and national grants and insurance payments to those in imminent need, is revealed. They both point to the need to explore what financial solutions are available to enable the UK to mitigate climate risk and buy time in the short term while investing in the environmental solutions that scientists have already identified as necessary to reduce climate change in the long-term (eg. replacing the use of fossil fuels with renewables and restocking carbon sinks).

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