All posts tagged supply chain

Small and young businesses disproportionately bear the costs of climate change

baby

Report provides eye-opening new insights into the demographics of commercial victims of climate change. Young firms, which comprise not only the lifeblood of many communities but are central to national economies, do not insure against what they consider to be less frequent, extreme events, and are therefore, disproportionately bearing the costs of the vagaries of weather resulting from climate change.

With the frequency and severity of extreme weather events and unseasonal weather increasing as a result of climate change, Weather & Economics has reported on the far-reaching effects to a wide range of sectors, including agriculture (particularly for farmers of citrus fruits, avocadoes, cocoa, viticulture, and cereals) as well as for the sectors of finance, sporting events, travel, transport, automobile parts, fashion and apparel, construction, food and beverages, and snow removal, to name but a few.

Continue Reading

How Businesses are Influencing the Relationship between the Weather and Consumer Demand

storm

When it comes to weather affecting consumer behaviour and purchase decisions, it has long been known that weather has an impact on consumer demand. The food we eat, clothes we wear, and how, where and how much we buy has all been scientifically proven to be influenced by the weather, it being second only to the economy in being the biggest single influencer on consumer behaviour.

Indeed, every day people make purchasing decisions based on the weather, from buying ice cream, sandals and swimsuits in the summer, hot soups and snow tyres in the winter, and less of beer and bottled water as autumn approaches. In turn, the seasonal cycle of weather purchases are accounted for by supply chain managers in stocking store rooms and giving discounts to clear out product before the seasonal event- or the season itself- leaves stockpiles of unsellable wares in their hands.

But what if everything we have known to be true about how the weather affects consumer behaviour and our ability to control this relationship was wrong? What if the seemingly uni-directional, unmanipulatable relationship between the weather and consumer behaviour was now being found to be being turned on its head? Specifically, what if a business could influence the relationship between the weather and consumers to its advantage?

Continue Reading